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Draw because you want too & not because you have too

Anonymous 12/30/2021 (Thu) 23:45:05 No. 5488
I apologize for the incoming blogpost. I'm a non-artist, but I've been told I'm good at drawing. I always had a passing interest in drawing, but the last time I drew was probably back in 2014 for an art class. I decided to properly sit down and draw something for the first time about two years ago. The first image (not Hitler by the way) is what I ended up with. I think it's pretty good, especially considering that it was >1. my first portrait ever (not counting all the Crayola drawings back in preschool of course), >2. drawn with my non-dominant hand. Since then, I've done about eight portraits, all of them done in probably 2-3 hours. Only three of them I think are decent enough for posting. This next one of Elizabeth Taylor is my seventh and probably my best, also the first in several months. The first one is from where I left off last night while the second is some cleaning up I was doing today because I thought it might be good enough to finish. While I think it is decent work, it's not as accurate to her as I'd like it to be because I don't actually know how to do basic things like sketching. At the moment, the only way I know how to improve my art quality is to get some finer pencils and smoother paper. I have the bare minimum education art, in fact this is the first time I've been to any /loomis/. I also don't know if my artwork is particularly good, because I've only been told that I'm good by non-artists, one art teacher, and a guy in a draw thread who said I was ahead of most anons. My question is: where do I start at my skill level? Do I go do the most basics or is it more efficient to start somewhere in the middle? Another thing, I want to segue into animation, with emphasis on human anatomy, so how do I go about doing that? My mind's eye is alright I suppose, but not nearly as sharp as my real one.
I don't mind blog posts at all, personally. >not Hitler by the way Those Fuhrerious Dubs say otherwise >I also don't know if my artwork is particularly good, because I've only been told that I'm good by non-artists, one art teacher, and a guy in a draw thread who said I was ahead of most anons. It isn't "good-good" but you are starting from a solid foundation as a beginner and that is good. Your observational skills are strong enough that you should be able to follow a lot of educational material adequately which will give you a leg up from some others just starting out. "Having a Knack" for something instinctually and being able to cultivate this into something more is far easier said and dreamt about than done but you can do it if you believe you can, and have the willpower to put in the work. >My question is: where do I start at my skill level? Do I go do the most basics or is it more efficient to start somewhere in the middle? Don't assume you're too good for the basics, as those basic foundational skills will be what you use the most.
>>5488 I am on a similar level to you. >>5493 is right. Going through basics can help a lot especially if you are self taught. Beginner books will likely cover some techniques you missed. Drawing sloped roofs in perspective was one of them for me. Over time work your way up to more advanced books. Life drawing is another good way to improve. Don't always focus on rendering models with as much detail as possible. Do some quick drawings. Focus on gesture (shape, fell, and energy of the pose), contours, or shadows. Once at a time per quick drawing. >Another thing, I want to segue into animation, with emphasis on human anatomy, so how do I go about doing that? My mind's eye is alright I suppose, but not nearly as sharp as my real one. It's best if you start from basics and work your way up. There are books and videos that cover what you need to know. >this is the first time I've been to any /loomis/ Then you probably do not know about the resource hub. It has books and links to videos that will help you. https://web.archive.org/web/20190721220321/http://www.8ch.net/loomis/hub.html
>>5497 >>5493 Alright, I'll try from the beginning. Also, is it worthwhile to do things in color early on or should I try to save that for later? It's something I've been tempted to do, but I think that it'll be tough for me because I don't sketch anything beforehand.
>>5499 I would stick to single color when learning shapes, anatomy, shading, etc. That way you do not waste time on picking colors and everything that goes with it. Learn coloring and realistic rendering in color, obviously. Try incorporate thing you learned in drawings you do for fun only. Don't get stuck grinding practice all the time either. It's too easy to get burned out that way, and you need to draw something else just so you have a chance to apply what you learned over past few hours or days.
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>>5488 > I want to segue into animation, with emphasis on human anatomy, so how do I go about doing that? My mind's eye is alright I suppose, but not nearly as sharp as my real one. i advice analyzing footage from action movies, draw every fourth frame or so at first but DO NOT TRACE it'll help you figure out how shit moves and how people move, but if you trace you learn nothing nude models are the best way to learn anatomy, but if you want to draw gore or something you should definitely get a book about it (pic related) i'm not experienced by any means, but this is how i got better at anatomy and animating people, it may not work for you you may need to get acquainted with the basics first (the animators' survival guide's good)


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